Cerebral palsy : Treatment

Treatment

There is no cure for cerebral palsy. The goal of treatment is to help the person be as independent as possible.

Treatment requires a team approach, including:

  • Primary care doctor
  • Dentist (dental check-ups are recommended around every 6 months)
  • Social worker
  • Nurses
  • Occupational, physical, and speech therapists
  • Other specialists, including a neurologist, rehabilitation physician, pulmonologist, and gastroenterologist

Treatment is based on the person’s symptoms and the need to prevent complications.

Self and home care include:

  • Getting enough food and nutrition
  • Keeping the home safe
  • Performing exercises recommended by the health care providers
  • Practicing proper bowel care (stool softeners, fluids, fiber, laxatives, regular bowel habits)
  • Protecting the joints from injury

Putting the child in regular schools is recommended, unless physical disabilities or mental development makes this impossible. Special education or schooling may help.

The following may help with communication and learning:

  • Glasses
  • Hearing aids
  • Muscle and bone braces
  • Walking aids
  • Wheelchairs

Physical therapy, occupational therapy, orthopedic help, or other treatments may also be needed to help with daily activities and care.

Medications may include:

  • Anticonvulsants to prevent or reduce the frequency of seizures
  • Botulinum toxin to help with spasticity and drooling
  • Muscle relaxants (baclofen) to reduce tremors and spasticity

Surgery may be needed in some cases to:

  • Control gastroesophageal reflux
  • Cut certain nerves from the spinal cord to help with pain and spasticity
  • Place feeding tubes
  • Release joint contractures

Stress and burnout among parents and other caregivers of cerebral palsy patients is common, and should be monitored.

Support Groups

For organizations that provide support and additional information, see cerebral palsy resources.

Prognosis (Expectations)

Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder. Long-term care may be required. The disorder does not affect expected length of life. The amount of disability varies.

Many adults are able to live in the community, either independently or with different levels of help. In severe cases, the person may need to be placed in an institution.

Complications

  • Bone thinning or osteoporosis
  • Bowel obstruction
  • Hip dislocation and arthritis in the hip joint
  • Injuries from falls
  • Joint contractures
  • Pneumonia caused by choking
  • Poor nutrition
  • Reduced communication skills (sometimes)
  • Reduced intellect (sometimes)
  • Scoliosis
  • Seizures (in about half of patients)
  • Social stigma

Calling Your Health Care Provider

Call your health care provider if symptoms of cerebral palsy develop, especially if you know that an injury occurred during birth or early infancy.


Review Date : 9/16/2009
Reviewed By : Daniel B. Hoch, PhD, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital; and Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

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